Certification in Business and Personal communications

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Career Development
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Outsourcing
If you had a candidate who was "Certified" by a reputable company or university in "Effective Communications" or "Advanced Interpersonal Communications", would it cause you to take notice of their resume or application over another individual?
ASKED: May 25, 2004  9:44 AM
UPDATED: June 2, 2004  11:24 AM

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No, I’d prefer practical experience over all the certificates in the world. Most anyone can sit and pass a test, but the real world demands much more. I’d take certificates with a grain of salt. If it was between someone who had experience and someone who had just a certificate but little or no experience, Experience would win hands down. Certificates can alway be acquired if needed, but experience is $$$ you are spending training or teaching once hired. The certificate has not done anything other than prove that they can learn and retain, but haven’t put into practical use nor exhibitied the other traits needed (Dealing with users, customers, other staff, how they handle problems, sress, etc.).

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  • EXPERTJohnBrandt
    And if two had equal experience, would training and certifications make a difference?
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  • Alnoor
    Recruiting is a sensitive process and you must have some indicators about performance. This can be the "certification" if both candidates have equal experience. It is sensitive as it is subjective. My opinion would be: besides their qualities written in the curriculum, how are you comfortable with both of them? That's the ultimate question. Regards
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  • RichardG12
    I would be curious as to how the individual came to taking such a course/certification. If they had to take it because of a weakness in their overall "portfolio" then I would not be swayed by it. If it was a company wide initiative then it's just a nice to have, in my opinion. Good interpersonal skills are not necessarily learned or taught once you start in the workplace. It stems from your personality and how you treat other people. Even after learning all the "right" things to do, many will continue on the way they have always been. In the area of communication skills, references and examples are probably worth a great deal more than a piece of paper. I guess having said all this, I did notice the certificate for far different reasons than likely intended. However, I would not consider the holder of such a certificate any more valuable, or desirable over another.
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  • Ericggordon
    Two issues to address here: 1. Certification 2. Communication Skills Regarding the former, I would not undervalue certification and or any advanced training. These "test" are designed to showcase a professional's ability to grasp technical and or business knowledge, concepts, strategies, and best practices. Granted I would not value certification alone, but they are a worthy stamp. Extensive practical experience does not automatically equate or translate to "successful" management, administration, support or implementation. If you are afforded the opportunity and time, I would recommend a three-tier interview process as follows: (1) interview candidates based on resume to job description match and cater questions toward what value will this individual bring to the table/team; (2) if candidate passes first round, setup a "hands-on" interview that addresses the individuals professed core competencies and skills as they directly meet your requirements; (3) in a final third round, have the individual meet with other members of your team/department in effort to gauge the relationship. Regarding the later (i.e., communication), pay particular attention to the resume. If the candidate has indeed acquired effective communication skills, these will be manifested throughout the resume. You may also wish to setup a phone interview to gauge the same. The key to this type of selection process is to determine if extensive and effective communication skills are required for the position. Will this individual interface with the business stakeholders and executive decision makers; will be individual work with out team members and take project lead as deemed appropriate. In other words, how communicative is the position. There are a lot of talented skilled individuals wihtin IT that unfortunately are not the most personable. But if teamed up with the right peers can bring a tremendous value to the organization. Long story short: paper is paper, find a match that would get the candidate in the door, but be very meticulous in your interview process. Remember, the wrong decision is more costly than having to invest in an employees growth and development.
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  • Etittel
    What's noteworthy or not depends on the overall context. I agree with others who've emphasized experience over other qualifications, and also with those who remark that certs tend to be most significant when 2 or more candidates might otherwise be quite similar in terms of job experience, education, skills, and so forth. As for certificates on business and personal communications, that doesn't hold much clout in the more technical fields where I tend to concentrate my efforts. HTH, --Ed-- Ed Tittel 2207 Klattenhoff Dr, Austin, TX 78728-5480 VP, Content Development & Delivery, Capstar LLC Series Editor, Que Exam Cram 2 & Training Guides Visit www.lanw.com and www.capstarlearning.com phone:512-252-7497 fax:512-252-8439 mbl:512-422-7943
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  • Simplesimon
    Boasting a certification in "Effective Communications" on a resume is basically a method of selling one's self to a company. If a cell phone provider boasts "clear communication" would you not test the product and see for yourself? Selecting human resources is not too different from any other kind of resources. The candidate must display effective communication in addition to advertising it. I would only find favor in a resume claiming these skills only if the quality and formatting of their resume attested to them.
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  • BigBob
    Interview, Interview, Interview... what is on paper is paper. Good, probing questions and watch the body que's. Ask them "What do you think was your most outstanding contribution with XYZ Company", then ask "What do you think the company thought your most outstanding contribution was?" Keep these for the end of the interview... they will really give you a key indicator of the person's skills.
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  • Melakeside
    From experience, I know that effective communications is a rare skill. Training or no training. I would want to bring that person in, if all other areas met my criteria, and have specific examples of when the effective communications proved itself. Also, if two candidates looked the same, training and certification have to hold some weight. It shows one motivated to advance if possible. Skill, some folks just don't know how to sell themselves on paper and a face to face will let you know not only are they qualified, but will they get along with your staff, very important!
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  • EXPERTJohnBrandt
    [...] Certification in Business and Personal communications [...]
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