certification help

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Linux
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Microsoft Windows
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SQL Server
Wireless
I had graduated from telecommunication last year and I was working as an IT Support for 1 year in Sudan I?m traveling to India to get some certification that could help me finding better job in IT or Telecommunication so I which if u could help me answering the following questions - Basically I think it?s good to start with CCNA cause it will give me good understanding in network especially TCP/IP, what?s your taught about that? is it good to start with CCNA? - I?m confused between Microsoft and RedHat. Some engineers here in Sudan recommend me to go for RedHat because it?s more stable, secure and it has better future especially in servers and they say if I choose Microsoft then MCSA will be enough for jobs like network administrator or engineer. Which one do you recommend? And if it?s Microsoft does taking the security side of MCSA or MCSE help to get job as network engineer or administrator ?if it?s Redhat which certification do u recommend putting in mind that I have no experience in Linux and the network jobs? - Telecommunication in Sudan is moving in the way of wireless (CDMA) & broadband connection. Which certification does u recommend in wireless filed that could help applying for jobs in Telecommunication? I would appreciate your advice because I want to get the best from my travel to India since there is no certification/partner center here in Sudan also if you know good institute in India please mention them. thanks for your help & time

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Hello,

That’s a rather tough question to answer. Cisco, Microsoft and Redhat certifications all are well recognized in the IT job market and will certainly help your career should you obtain them. Question is how much time and money do you have to invest in certification and ultimatley where would you like to eventually end up?

My advice for a quick path into the job market would be to seek some type of administration cert. If you choose Microsoft’s route, the MCSA cert is a good start. It is a recognized cert in the job market and will land you a better paying job out of the gate then the CCNA would. A nice thing also is that an MCSA cert can be upgraded to MCSE status with two additional tests. Specializing in security is also a good choice since security is such a hot topic these days.

Once you have your foot in the door, then expand to the CCNA and maybe even CCNP. These certs coupled with the experience you would now have as an administrator will expand your value in the job market greatly.

I’m affraid my knowledge of Redhat certs is limited at best, but if the job market in your area dictates Redhat to be a better career path, then my advice would be to seek the Redhat equivilent to the MCSA and follow the same path as above.

Good luck!

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  • Bugdown
    I am going to try to answer to your questions briefly. I am somewhat in the same type of situation you found yourself in. 1) It is good to start with your CCNA; it permits you to have a broader understanding of computer network. 2) From my experience I would suggest that you get you Microsoft certification. Although Linux is important Microsoft still plays a major role in the computer world. Saying that, you should, on your own time, try master UNIX or Linux, later on you can even go for your RedHat certifications. 3) I am not too familiar with wireless technology Finally when it comes to IT, experience matters the most. Certifications can only help you to get a job, but it won't help you to keep the job.
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  • Rknrlkid
    Let me give you the solution we use at the school I work at. Not everyone agrees with it, but it does appear to cover most bases for most employees everywhere. Get your certifications in the following order: CompTIA A+ Comptia Network+ ANY Microsoft test for MCP MCSA CCNA CompTIA Security+ Here's the logic behind it: 1. Many American firms are now requiring at a minimum A+ and Network+. These verify entry level skills. 2. Take at least one Microsoft certification to become a Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP). Uusally this test is the first in the series for MCSA/MCSE: 70-210 (Windows 2000 Professional) or 70-270 (Windows XP Professional). 3. MCSA or CCNA can be done alternatively. CCNA is actually more valuable, and parts of the CCNA training will prepare you for the Net+. But the Microsoft tests help give you greater credibility overall with employers. Now, note that these are not done overnight. You are looking at a PROCESS that takes several years. Start out with the A+ and Net+, to document your entry level skills. Use these to get you a job, and keep plugging away at certifications to demonstrate your growth and proficiency. One word of warning though: These tests are no joke. I've seen many people think they can take one without preparation, and fail miserably. They are too expensive to be taking just to fail. In some cases its computer trivia, so you have to know what the test writers are looking for. Good luck on starting the process! As someone who has done it (and still doing it), I can tell you its a lot of work, but reqarding, and will definitely set you apart from the rest of the job seeking crowd.
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  • WHalverson
    The other responses have given you a good idea on the sequencing of the courses. As a hiring manager, I can tell you that I would also be curious about how you fit your specialized knowledge of Microsoft and Cisco products into the larger arena on internetworking. RedHat is a UNIX based product and therefore represents a completely different design philosophy towards networking than either Microscoft or Cisco. Don't limit your training by only learning how to configure a vendor's product line. Product knowledge is not sufficient; it is only necessary. You have to understand the limitations of a vendor's product line and how it confines your choices. Best wishes for a great career! William
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  • DrillO
    I basically agree with the others. Of course you will get variations on the theme depending on where certain loyalties lie. I am curious thought about the infrastructure in you area. If you are a telecom type and there are major builds going on in the country's infrastructure, why not get in on it? Wireless is an interesting and fun technology to be involved in. I have been working with it in various capacities for a while now, and I really enjoy it. There could be some very lucrative opportunities on the ground floor if you play your cards right. Just my thoughts, Best of luck to you, Paul
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  • TheVyrys
    You will no doubt get many great angles on this question.....as you can see already. Your idea of starting with CCNA is a good idea too. It will definitely help you get a good foundation for the rest of the certs you mention....whether it be Microsoft, Redhat, blah blah blah...most any employers networks all use routing, switches, etc. and that is a lot of what CCNA helps with. As others have mentioned, A+ is something to go with early as well, and then Network +. If you get those covered, you will have made yourself quite marketable for now to get employed, and then be primed and ready to plow through the next level of certs, no matter which ones you decide on later. Hang in there and by all means don't just get the paper certs. Make em count or you will be looking for 'another' job later. Your programming should look like this: BEGIN sudanCCNAA+Network+ IF Certs=yes THEN C:megetgoodjob=TRUE END Good luck!
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  • ItDefPat1
    All previous answers are solid, good advice. CCNA focused on network, MCSA on Operating system; RHSE similar for linux. Any of the CompTIA (end with a + like network+, etc.) are also good starting places, not specific to vendor. These good way to get into IT. Going with these - non-vendor - may help you to adapt to "anything" if you don't know which vendor being used. Be sure to remember to continue certifications - vendor specific or technology. I'm not so clear on telecom. Ed Tittle writes on several tech target sites (search securty, search network, etc.) - he is respected authority. For certification info, look at certcities.com and certmag.com also - Ec publishes there also. I'm formerly MS, Novell and Checkpoint certs; also network, disaster recovery certs. Current ISACA.org CISM and ISC2.org CISSP certs. Hoping to do INCOSE.org CSEP soon.
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  • Pilot737
    Thank alot for your advice it was very helpfull and informative.
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  • Joshua2
    What do you 'want' to do most in Tech? Whatever you decide - start with that one.
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