Career Change

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Development
Hello to all, I am new here and I thought this would be a great place to start. I am very interested in programming but have no programming background. I have a background in networking as a network Engineer but would like to jump track and move to developing. I have a little experience with vb but that is it. This is the second time that I have lost my job due to cutbacks and company buyouts. I am 31 and my question to everyone is..... **** IS IT TO LATE FOR ME TO CHANGE CAREERS*****.. I am very interested in VB.NET,ASP.net and web development etc. I am looking for everyones thoughts and opinions. Thank you wannabe31

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Free Advice.

Do what is going to make you happy! There has got to be a niche somewhere for you. If you are US Based it might be hard to move that direction. But with the right amount of drive etc. Go for it!

I recommend a web site to start programming:

<a href=”http://www.how-to-learn-computer-programming.com”>http://www.how-to-learn-computer-programming.com</a>

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  • WRatte
    if you have vb experience, i can recommend going into c#. from all the IT ads i have seen the last two years, it is the most popular language for newly graduated students to get a job with. the libraries, etc are the same as vb, just the language structure is different. if you focus on database interactions and databindings while you study up on c# you're most likely to get a job sooner than later - of course you'll have to settle with starting at the bottom like newly graduated students, but that's better than nothing at all - older people won't easily get highish paying odd jobs. at least you'll have business experience going for you
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  • MooseDrool
    I switched from a computer hardware background to application development at about your age and it was the right choice for me. Good luck.
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  • CharlesJC
    Wannabe31, First you need to decide which development camp you want to be in, Microsoft (.Net) or Java. You seem to be leaning towards .Net, which is cool, as that is what I did. However, to make an informed decision you need to look at the Java opportunities (jobs) as well. Enough about Java. My suggestion would be to get the MCAD/MCSD Self-Study kit. It covers both C# and VB.Net languages, as well as the .Net Framework and some more advanced concepts. I think that this will be a useful tool in learning to develop, as the lab exercises are effective for training. (No, I don't work for MS or an affiliate. However, I do own two copies - one I bought for learning and the other I got when I went took a MCSD certification course.) The certification is not necessary, but it can help open doors. Also, I would suggest against one of those one or two week certification course the $$$, unless you already know how to code. (There were a couple of guys that thought they would learn how to code while there. ... It was a bad idea, because the pace was too fast. Learn first!) The point is that the labs show you how to do it and the lessons tell you when to use it. You may want to consider consulting, if you haven?t already, as a way to get development experience. Some consider it a way of life. Others use it to keep food on the table while between permanent (I mean really long term) jobs. By the way, it is never too late to change careers. You just have to be willing to start at the bottom, as that is where your experience level puts you, in most cases. If you are interested in the self-study kit, let me know. I could be pursuaded to part with one of mine for a really good price, because I found myself in a position very similar to yours, not too long ago. CJC
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  • Duapps
    I'm not sure when someone is too old to change careers but it is certainly not 31. The good thing about programming is that there are excellent, easily accessible tools to help you get started right now. I have also found Community College Courses productive. In your case, choose classroom courses over online so you can meet teachers and other developers. Don't assume you will "start at the bottom" either. Look for areas where you can combine programming with the knowledge you have accumulated as a network engineer. I highly recommend the very practical book "What Color is Your Parachute?". The author's last name is Bolles who would say there is no age limit to changing careers. Good Luck
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