Can’t access System on LAN behind DSL modem

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Networking
Two systems running XP Pro SP2. Trying to access PC on LAN behind ActionTEc GT701 DSL Modem over internet. Firewalls disabled, Can see and modify GT701 using remote management, cant map network drive or access system on LAN over internet. All security settings are set for everyones use/modification. Get errors saying "path not found" or access security. Have tried using network places, new network connection and map network drive from tools with same results. Any help/suggestions are very much appreciated.
ASKED: November 9, 2006  1:22 PM
UPDATED: November 22, 2006  2:20 AM

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I’m not familiar with the ActionTEc GT701, but normally you have to redirect incomming traffic from internet to a ip-address and port, without this incomming traffic is not allowed to your lan. In the router config go to something like nat or napt (address/port translation) and either set a napt entry from internet to the pc address or use a default server address for the pc. The last will transfer all incomming traffic to the pc. This has to be done on both sides.

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  • Cavalan
    Whanzens is correct, Just to paint a picture for you so hopefully it all makes sence. Apologies for teaching anyone to suck eggs, but not sure of the technical level so covering all bases. The internet is a huge mesh of computers routers and other devices. To be on the internet you need to have a "public" address, much like a postal address but as you are probably aware is made up of 4 numbers (e.g. 165.213.1.234). There is a convention for these and the distribution of PUBLIC addresses is controlled and regulated. When your DSL modem connects to the internet it will be given a public address and therefore a "presence" on the web. Likewaise the other DSL modem will also have a presence on the web, however, the two computers behind these modems will not directly have public presence, relying on the modem/router to pass any traffic to it. If you only have one device on your home/business network behind the modem/router (whatever) then all you need to do is to tell the router to pass everything directed for the public address it has been given through to your computers internal (Private) address and vica versa, you may have more than one allocated address (Given by your ISP) in which case you will find that any information sent to either address you have been allocated will travel to the modem and the modem would then be responsible for distributing internally as appropriate. All you need to do is to tell the modem/router where to send this information internally (IE your workstation) as it does NOT have a public presence for many, many reasons... To summarise, you need to tell both modem/routers to forward any traffic directed to them to your internal computers. I would suggest you specify the actual ports required for the software to work (there may be a number of them depending on the software you are trying to use) be very much aware though that unless you are clever with these "rules" you could open up your computers to ANYONE to access core system files etc unless you specifiy source and destination IP's very carefully. Hope this is of some help, Good luck,
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  • NickShm
    1) find out whether you have a public IP address from your ISP 2) make sure you know the resources you're going to connect to ex. files, folders, desktop itself, printers and so on. In your case I would suggest that you're going to setup the FTP or Remote Desktop Connection. 3) Depends on your choice you have to select right port to open on your FIREWALL (create the rule), ex. ftp=21 http=80 rdc=3389 and FORWARD this port to your private (local) IP address. I don't think you know that it's not the same with the standard WINDOWS FIREWALL as well as I know that by default all incoming ports (inbound traffic) are closed on the router. 4) As far as you complete these steps, next thing is to install an aplication that would serve your data packets from your office pc to the local machine. If you're about to set up the FTP - try ServU software and configure your router to forward all quiries from TCP port 21 to your local machine, ex. 192.168.1.100. Take a look at this website http://www.portforward.com Remote Desktop Connection doesn't require any special software to make the connection. After opening port 3389 on your router (all under PORT FORWARDING or FIREWALL RULES)and point it to your local PC, right click on MY COMPUTER, go to Remote and tick the box @allow remote access@. Specify users you want to allow remote acess to this PC. 5) At your work place click start/run/mstsc. Fill in your dynamic/static public IP address that has been assigned to your DSL modem and click @connect@.
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  • Mortree
    If all this is as clear as mud to you, I suggest you consider a different route. If you don't understand port forwarding and firewalls etc, there is a lot of potential to have your computer gutted by worms, viruses, hackers etc. The simpler layman's solution is to leave all normal out of the box secrutiy configurations in place. Then install simple web software from GOTOMYPC.com (or webex.com or half a dozen other sites) on your home computer. Afterwards you just log into the GOTOMYPC.COM site and enter your account and password. Most of these sites cost money in the long run, typically $10/month. But there are couple free home use ones and almost all have trial periods -- some up to 30 days. http://paininthetech.com/remote_connection_and_assistance_roundup?page=0%2C6
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  • Mortree
    If all this is as clear as mud to you, I suggest you consider a different route. If you don't understand port forwarding and firewalls etc, there is a lot of potential to have your computer gutted by worms, viruses, hackers etc. The simpler layman's solution is to leave all normal out of the box secrutiy configurations in place. Then install simple web software from GOTOMYPC.com (or webex.com or half a dozen other sites) on your home computer. Afterwards you just log into the GOTOMYPC.COM site and enter your account and password. Most of these sites cost money in the long run, typically $10/month. But there are couple free home use ones and almost all have trial periods -- some up to 30 days. http://paininthetech.com/remote_connection_and_assistance_roundup?page=0%2C6
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  • Celtic
    Hello, Most chances are your router is performing NAT to the inside hosts. Since you can't access private IP addresses from the Internet, try configuring port forwarding (PAT) on your router for whichever ports you need to access; for example forward port 3389 (RDP) to your PC if you want to access it from the Internet via Remote Desktop Connection. Hope I helped...
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  • Alien1
    Some additional info. I think I tried to be to brief before in my request. 1. One system running WIN XP PRo, connected with DSL Cisco 678. Firewalls disabled, Folder set up for sharing with everyone enabled for permissions and access. 2. Client system running XP Home, connected to internet with Cable Modem Dlink DCM 202. When I try and set up a shared connection using network places from the client, I input IP addressservershare and get an error saying " the folder you entered is not valid" After getting the IP address from "whatismyip.com" I can ping the address with success. If I try and map a network drive from the client using the same information, I get the same results. Thanks for your help and input, I need it, I am running out of things to try.
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  • TNGeorge
    Even with out the DSL modem I have received similar results. They have been resolved by understanding that when I map a drive there several different ways it will play out. 1. If I try to map by name, the name resolution some times will work but mostly it will not. 2. If I try to map with an IP I get a 50-50 result. I have found that most of the issues are name resolution from the destination system not being able to resolve the name of the initiating system so that it can communicate back. Extra care must be used in establishing the complete DNS name of the systems especially when DHCP supplies one suffix and you are using a fully qualified domain name with a different one. You may need to set up your own DNS to get solid success or an old fashion WINS. This is especially so, if your DNS does not do Dynamic updates or will not register more then one suffix. If you are just setting up two systems to talk to each other and are not running a network just put the entries in the HOSTS file. Be sure to use the real IPs if you are NATed or PROXYed.
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  • bmarone
    OK, some more things to try. 1) Someone mentioned gotomypc. There is a free VPN-ish program called Hamachi http://www.hamachi.cc and as VPN you can use it to connect directly to users in your "network". Free up to 5 users, either total or maybe concurrent. Hamachi was snapped up by LogMeIn.com, a service similar to gotomypc, but it's still free. 2) In lieu of port forwarding, most routers have a special "DMZ" setting for a single internal address, usually forwarding all traffic there unrestricted. Beware, you're essentially having that machine open to the Internet, and unprotected machines last as little as 15-20 mins avg before getting exploited. Best to fool with this setting when you can (bang,bang,bang,bang) remote/login to the actiontec, DMZ the machine, test both sides, un-DMZ the machine. 3) try networking from CMD prompt with the NET.EXE command. Whether over Hamachi, DMZ, or port forwarding, you should be able to NET VIEW ip.ip.ip.ip to see open shares, and should connect using NET USE ip.ip.ip.ipIPC$ /USER:machinenameuserid * to connect as a specific local user, password prompted. 4) brs webweaver http://www.brswebweaver.com is a small, free ftp/http server. You can use this to serve files in either protocol, and on any port if 21 and 80 are blocked. If you want to forward the ports on the actiontec, this would be a good program to test. You can even run the http/ftp server on ports 137/139 to test out if your ISP or the actiontec blocks these.
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  • Mortree
    15-20 minutes is optimistic. I have had PCs with no firewall be infected in under 10 seconds. Depends a lot on if you have all the latest patches and have file security tight...which you don't. But a VPN solution is on the right track because of keypoint #2 below -- if you have the network smarts. Not familar with the program just mentioned -- maybe it covers up some of the technical details of VPN. But basically VPNs can hide what protocols you are sending across the Internet such that ISPs won't block you and bad guys can't spy on you or alter information. KEY POINT #1: Look at the IP address of your Local Area Connection via Properties and Status tab. That will even show DHCP addresses granted ICS, firewall boxes, and cable/DSL modems. If that IP is 192.168.x.y or 10.x.y.z or 172.16.x.y (where x, y, and z are some number 0-255) then your machine IP can't be used across the Internet - only on your home LAN or maybe that particular ISP's local neighborhood network. The IP you get from a website can often be the public IP assigned to your modem or hardware firewall. A feature called NAT (Network Address Translation) can connect traffic from that public IP to your PC...but usually only when your PC started the connection. Unexpected IP traffic (not a reponse to what you sent) sent to the public IP would be dropped. Port forwarding can send traffic for a specific port like TCP 445 (File Sharing) from the public IP to a specific PC on your home LAN. KEY POINT #2: Even if both PC have legal public IPs directly assigned to your Local Area Conncetion, most ISPs block certain common IP protocols like TCP 445, UDP 137, 138, 139 for file sharing -- because most home users don't want their private info going across the Internet unencrypted. Plus file sharing protocols provide an easy route to spread malware (worms, etc) which often explode in terms of sucking up bandwidth.
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