Burn in Test data verify failure

100 pts.
Tags:
Burn in Test
Data Verify Failure
Hard drives
Passmark
SATA
I have a crate of 40gb hard drives that I need to stress test. I have a registered copy of Burn in Test by Passmark I'm using to test the hardware. I've run a few through already and 2 out of 3 are failing due to "Data Verify Failures". The help text that came with BiT aren't very specific. On the topic of Data Verify Failures all they say is this "This is a serious error that indicates that the data read from the disk is NOT the same as the data that was written to the disk. This could indicate a hardware error." I've tried to find information about this error online, but almost everything I find on google has to do with burning data to cd's. A few discussions I've seen have suggested that a Data Verify Failure could be as insignificant as a difference in the time stamp on a file. My question to you all is this. How dangerous is this error? I need to know definitively whether we can rely on these hard drives or if we should toss them. Thank you.

Software/Hardware used:
Passmark Burn in Test V6.0 Professional, Western Digital WD Caviar 40gb HD, a SATA/IDE to USB2 converter, WinXP

Answer Wiki

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Did you try the actual Passmark Support Forums?

http://www.passmark.com/forum/archive/index.php/f-7.html

There is an entry specifically addressing this error message (below)

“If you are seeing this error on the disk test, then it means that the data read from the disk is not the same as the data written to the disk. Normally this is a fairly serious error because it can lead to file corruption on the disk.

In the detailed error log file you should find some additional details for this error that show the value that was read from the disk and the value that was expected.

Most of the time the fault is with the disk itself but on rare occasions it can also be caused by bad RAM. This is becuase some of the system RAM is used to buffer data being set / received from the disk.

Even more rare would be something like a design flaw in the disk controller or MB that causes failure under high load when using multiple drives.”

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