Bandwidth

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Bandwidth
Hi everybody, My name is Ali Mbilo and I am from Congo. My question is, if I am getting a 1Mbps bandwidth signal from my Internet Provider, can I use more than 1,500 computers to connect to the internet by using switches and routers? My provider told me that the 1Mbps is good only for 100Pc's. But the highest bandwith I am going to use is only 512Kbps. So how many computers can be connected to it? Is the use of switches and routers will help me to connect more than 1,500 computers to a network without using all my 1Mbps per month? 1Mbps---->Switches (100 ports)---->Routers(1500 ports) This is really important for me. Thanks, Ali Mbilo
ASKED: February 9, 2006  1:14 AM
UPDATED: February 10, 2006  3:29 AM

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Dear sir,
you can connect 1500 computers, but unable to use all the system at a single hit.

Regards
Raja Balasubramaniam

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  • Bobkberg
    Allow me to expand on Mr. Balasubramaniam's reply. The real questions are: - How many users are going to connect at any one time? - What sort of bandwidth with each user typically consume? - What is the expected response time? - Is this for general Internet browsing, or something that is enterprise specific? The key value of switches and routers in this case is to reduce (or manage) the bottlenecks that occur within your own network, as well as providing logical (administrative) divisions to allow effective management of your network, and keep superfluous traffic (that is, misdirected) from clogging your Internet connection. If your users are likely to be visiting the same sites, you might well consider buying a caching proxy server, so that duplicate pages (www.yahoo.com for example) do not need to be downloaded through your connection, but instead can simply be re-served by the proxy server. One aside - you didn't ask, but I'll mention it anyway. Providing that many users with general Internet access - particularly if they haven't had it before will result in a LARGE drop in productivity, as they spend time exploring new things that have nothing to do with the business at hand. Bob
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  • Astronomer
    Bob hit the main points but since we have a similar situation our "solution" may prove useful. We have between 1500 and 2000 nodes in the college and have three T1 lines to the internet. We are also forced to use a protocol for our financial software that requires the connection to not be clogged. Some students were using us as a conduit for constant downloads, (mainly music), while they were in class. I was informed that the finance people were getting bumped off of their sessions on average every five minutes. We set up a squid proxy server that limits total usage by student systems to 2Mbit. The firewall was altered to prevent student systems from bypassing the proxy. Within a few months we received complaints about not being able to browse the internet from classrooms. It seems the downloading was taking so much of the proxy bandwidth that there wasn't enough left for normal browsing. I did more research and altered the rules so individual workstations were limited. We currently allow a 2Mbit bucket before limiting bandwidth but after that downloads are throttled to ~36Kbits. Normal browsing works much better and the finance people only get bumped about once each day. We are about to implement another tweak that will open individual bandwidths after hours when normal usage is minimal. Since you have a smaller pipe you may want to use smaller numbers. Staff systems are not using the proxy but we have asked them to refrain from non-business related downloads and to do their business downloads after hours. For us this is a temporary measure until the obsolete protocol is retired, (originally scheduled last summer), and we get a bigger pipe this summer. I had recommended several permanent solutions including some suggested by this forum but they were rejected by management. I consider this a way to muddle through until we have the fixes mentioned. Part of the problem is the fact that our internet connections are so small. I tested this after hours and was able to fill the entire 4.5Mbit pipe easily using just my laptop. Using this method you can allow all of your systems to access the internet and control how much each station uses. You can even give different limits to different address ranges. rt
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  • Bobkberg
    Mr. Mbilo messaged me privately, but I prefer to answer in the group discussion for two reasons (Nothing he said was private) 1) The answer (if correct) may benefit others and 2) The answer (if not correct) is then subject to correction by others. Either way, you wind up with a better answer. Mr. Mbilo's message concerned allocation of bandwith, which Astronomer also addressed directly. I don't know if those messages crossed in the mail, but in the interest of completeness, I'll take the risk of repeating things. Think of your internet connection as a water pipe or hose. The term "pipe" to describe any sort of network connection is widely used. With that in mind, if everyone turns on the tap (browses the web) at the same time, then everyone gets a trickle of water. If you put flow and pressure regulators in the pipeline at key branching points, then you can make sure that no one (or as few as possible) have the capacity to deny service to others - which is precisely what Astronomer is suggesting with his use of the squid proxy. There are also commercial solutions (Packet Shapers, or Traffic Shapers) on the market, but the tradeoff is going to be spending money or time & expertise (or spending time to develop the expertise) to come up with a workable solution to the problem. The only traffic shaper I'm personally familiar with is the Packeteer, but I know that there are other products out there that perform similar functions. Good luck, Bob
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  • Avcavc
    Ali, Yes uou can connect 1500 computers because your concurrent usage will not be more than 1Mpbs (understood from your mail). Little change in your network flow diagram 1 Mbps from ISP-----> Router---> Switch(Main)--->Multiple switches for 1500 terminals. Amit Chaudhary
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