Anyone using Veritas BMR (Bare Metal Restore) or other imaging for Disaster Recovery?

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Backup & recovery
I am looking for feedback on Veritas Bare Metal Restore as a Disaster Recovery upgrade to my current Veritas NetBackup tape library. I understand that the BMR Server does not run on Windows. I could run this on an RS/6000 (AIX) but am concerned about the setup time in a DR situation.
ASKED: November 5, 2004  2:34 PM
UPDATED: November 10, 2004  10:59 AM

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BMR does run on a Windows environment.

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  • Pierredorion
    You are correct in your assumption; the BMR server components (main, boot and file server) can only be installed on AIX, SunOS or HP-UX. This is mostly due to Windows? lack of support for a true network boot (bootp or bootstrap protocol). As far as set up time on AIX in a recovery situation, that particular operating system offers a nice feature called MKSYSB (make system backup). This feature allows you to create a bootable image of your system while the system is running. In other words, AIX is capable of creating a backup of its own system data on a media that you can boot from and restore following a disaster. Using that technology, you could restore your BMR server from a previously created MKSYSB bootable media at the same time you are rebuilding and restoring your NetBackup server. You would run a new MKSYSB every time you update the BMR server such as when a new set of OS files are created for a BMR client (known as SRT or shared resource tree). The main limitation to this approach is the capacity of the media used to create the MKSYSB. A single SRT can take up to 400MB of space on the BMR server and a different SRT is required for each OS platform and version. Depending on the number of different OS versions in your environment, you could easily end up creating a BMR server for which a single MKSYSB image exceeds the capacity of many removable media. The choice of media and availability of a similar device at your recovery site are two aspects to consider as well.
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