400 to 400 printing

1000 pts.
Tags:
AS/400
DataCenter
Printing
RPGLE
I need to have a spoolfile on AS400#1 that is directed to an outq on AS400#2 as it is created and/or move it manually from outq on #1 to outq on #2. A remote outq exist on #2 but I seem to be missing something on how to access it from #1. The remote outq on #2 will print on printer created on #1. I would like to be able direct print files #1 to #2 using over rides or printfile definition to use specified outq. I think I am not seeing or just not understanding. I would love to have an example on how someone else has done this. Thanks

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I think I cannot quite follow you. As far as I understand your question : You want to print a spoolfile that is created on system 1 on a printer on system 2. Is that the case ? If so than it is quite simple. Following is an example to change the outq at system 1 (the system where the outfile is created)
CHGOUTQ OUTQ(yourlib/youroutq)
RMTSYS(*INTNETADR)
CNNTYPE(*IP)
MFRTYPMDL(*IBM4070)=this is model dependend
INTNETADR(’153.112.1.10′) = >IP addres system 2
or if you printer is in a netword and has an ip address of his own you can use this ip address
CHGOUTQ OUTQ(Yourlib/youroutq)
RMTSYS(System2)
RMTPRTQ(Yourlib/youroutq)
CNNTYPE(*IP)
MFRTYPMDL(*IBM4070)
INTNETADR(’153.112.1.11′)
remarks the same as above.
Then the only thing to do is start the rmote writer and populate the outq 1 on system 1 and they will print on system 2.

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  • TomLiotta
    I need to have a spoolfile on AS400#1 that is directed to an outq on AS400#2... A function runs on #1. You want its output to go to an outq on #2. ...as it is created and/or move it manually from outq on #1 to outq on #2. You don't care how it gets there. A remote outq exist on #2... Okay. ...but I seem to be missing something on how to access it from #1. Why would you want to? Why not use a remote outq on #1? If you're going to have the output moved automatically from #1 to #2, you will probably do it through a remote outq anyway. The remote outq on #2 will print on printer created on #1. Then why move the output from #1 to #2 if it's just going to be sent back to #1 for printing? I would like to be able direct print files #1 to #2 using over rides or printfile definition to use specified outq. Why not just print it directly to the printer on #1? Why have a remote outq on #1 to send the output to a remote outq on #2 that sends to another outq on #1 for printing? Why not just send it straight to the local outq on #1? I'm guessing that it's either because you want to learn how to use remote outqs or because you have a mistaken impression of what a "remote" outq does. To touch on the second one first, a "remote" outq is one that sends to another system. It's called "remote" because it represents a remote resource. You put output into it on your end, and it reappears on the remote system. You usually wouldn't access a remote outq on a remote system; you usually would access a remote outq on your own local system. The outq then does the task of moving the output across. You create remote outqs on your system for you to use; you don't use remote outqs on some other system. That's about all there is for that possibility. Learning how to use remote outqs might be a little more tricky. First, you can set up a remote outq on #1 that points to #2. When you run the CRTOUTQ command, put the host name of #2 into the 'Remote system' parameter. If you want your output to be handled by the remote outq on #2, then put the name of the #2 outq into the 'Remote printer queue' parameter of your #1 outq. So the outq on #1 points to the outq on #2 which points back to some printer outq back on #1. It's a pretty roundabout way of doing things, but it can be done. Once the configuration is in place, you run a STRRMTWTR command to start up the system function that does the work for your #1 outq. The same command needs to be run on #2. Once the system function has been started, output placed on the outq automatically gets sent to the other system; and it will continue handling new output until the writer is ended. The writer takes care of the sending side of things. There is also a receiving side. Systems aren't going to let just anything come in without you taking action to allow it. Since both #1 and #2 will be receiving from the other side at some point, both systems must start their listening tasks too. You do that by running the STRTCPSVR command for the *LPD server on both systems. So, there will be remote outqs on both systems, both systems will have their remote writers started and both sides will have their listeners started. Just six total commands between the two systems, and the contents of the outq on #1 move across the network and back and then out to your printer. That's just about all there is to it. Of course, if you have firewalls or other restrictions, or if you don't know the host names, or if other details bring obstacles, the details need to be attended to. But you can always ask questions about those. Tom
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  • WoodEngineer
    Check out the native command SNDTCPSPLF. That allows us to do what I think you are describing.
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