The iSeries Blog

Mar 23 2007   12:42PM GMT

Where did you say those backup tapes are kept



Posted by: Colin Steele
Tags:
iSeries Blunders

Search400.com member David shares his blunder:

Years ago, in my first AS/400 job, the company I worked for had only one box to use for both production and development. (I cringe when I think about that, now.)  When we were developing, we would just copy the production data into our personal libraries so that we could do our testing.

So, the pattern went:

- Copy production data to personal library (using CPYF)

- Run my program over the data in my personal library

- Inspect the results and make program changes accordingly

- Clear the file in my personal library (CLRPFM)

- Go back to the first step and start again

As you can probably already imagine, during one testing cycle, I accidentally cleared the PRODUCTION table instead of the copy in my library. When my index finger was a millimeter away from the Enter key, I realized what I was about to do. But, it was too late to stop.Within a couple minutes, the end-users were calling me, asking, “What happened to my pricing quotes?”I turned to my manager (who sat in a desk directly behind me), and I told him what just happened. He smiled, he chucked, and he showed me where the backup tapes were stored.We restored the table’s data from the previous night, but that day’s data was gone.I don’t think we ever told the users why one day’s worth of pricing quotes needed to be re-entered.

Do you have a blunder to share?  

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  • Colin Steele
    Poor performance of your security administrator. It is obvious since the first release of S/38 in 1978 that the security profile of a programmer should have neither existence nor any update/add/delete rights to data files in production libraries. The method you used was anyway poor as the production data changes constantly in real time. As you often have to repeat tests you should be able to rely on non changing input data. So it is a better practice to copy periodically (part of) the production data to a third library which serves as a source to renew the test library data files. But if you have non professionals as system or security administrators ...
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