The Real (and Virtual) Adventures of Nathan the IT Guy

Apr 17 2013   12:51PM GMT

The Holy Grail of Batteries?

Nathan Simon Nathan Simon Profile: Nathan Simon

Is this what everyone has been waiting for? Finally a change in the way we see batteries. How long have we increased the power of our mobile devices while not increasing our overall battery capacity? Sure the Galaxy S4 and HTC One have slightly larger batteries, but we increased the resolution and processor, which will in turn drain a conventional battery. The microbattery being explained here can recharge in minutes… and this is just speaking about phones. The possibilities are truly endless…

Mechanical science and engineering professor William P. King led a group that developed the most powerful microbatteries ever documented.

Though they be but little, they are fierce. The most powerful batteries on the planet are only a few millimeters in size, yet they pack such a punch that a driver could use a cellphone powered by these batteries to jump-start a dead car battery – and then recharge the phone in the blink of an eye.

“This is a whole new way to think about batteries,” King said. “A battery can deliver far more power than anybody ever thought. In recent decades, electronics have gotten small. The thinking parts of computers have gotten small. And the battery has lagged far behind. This is a microtechnology that could change all of that. Now the power source is as high-performance as the rest of it.” source article

No we won’t be seeing this technology in the immediate future, but its coming, so expect to hear more about it! Head on over to the source article to read the rest.

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