Enterprise Linux Log

May 26 2008   9:15PM GMT

Sailing on Linux (and chicken) wings at MIT

Suzanne Wheeler Suzanne Wheeler Profile: Suzanne Wheeler

In response to the last post I wrote for this blog, a user commented: “It’s the opposition that has the boring names. Linux is fun, don’t ya know.”

Well, now I know.

This week, I went to my second Boston Linux and Unix Users (BLU) group meeting at MIT. It was also my second time going alone, and I once again felt a tad timid. A young, female reporter at a BLU meeting, I have learned, is much like a hippie at an NRA meeting — people are curious.

The topic of the night’s presentation was High-End Audio on Linux. I figured I would get to hear some music and pass out my business cards to Linux admins and potential interviewees. And I was right; my pencil broke early on because I took mounds of notes on audio software engineering while periodically perking up for music demos.

But they weren’t done with me yet. Two Linux admins chatted me up after the meeting, subsequently inviting me for free chicken wings at MIT’s student hangout, the Muddy Charles.

I followed and learned about the rise and demise of the legendary Boston Computer Society, the largest such group in the world at one point, and about MIT’s other student bar, The Thirsty Ear. “Does it usually have live music?” I asked. No, that’s just the name. On the third leg of my progressive Linux party, I saw a video of the MIT Salsa club in action. I made a new buddy when I said I had taken Flamenco classes in Spain.

So I haven’t drunk any Kool-Aid but have now officially eaten the Linux chicken wings. Can I take off my “Ms. Linux Chicken” name tag now?

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