Enterprise Linux Log

May 9 2007   12:57PM GMT

Red Hat Summit (inspirational) keynote: You are here

ITKE ITKE Profile: ITKE

SAN DIEGO — Well, if you were one of the 1,400 sitting in the audience today in sunny San Diego then you were most certainly here, obviously.

But if not then what Red Hat CEO and chairman Matt Szulik meant was that the open source and open standards in the hands of the developers, IT managers and systems administrators today will be the applications tomorrow’s developers will use en masse. It’s for the children, really.

“We will continue to educate at the lowest possible cost,” Szulik said in many ways, many times — often flanked by pictures of the $100ish One Laptop Per Child lime green laptop being used by children from Brazil and Nigeria.

Szulik told the audience that the discussion in the Linux and open source communities needed to undergo a shift in this age of social unrest from kernel-exclusive fare into the migration of data. “Start thinking about creating access to public networks,” he said.

Indeed, the “social network” UI for the little laptops that could is more impressive than the Windows XP one running on my Dell D620 right now (I know, tell me about it. My fingers actually burn a little using a Windows OS at a Linux summit). Szulik used the opportunity to call for a large scale open source software initiative; available to all. “We cannot leave the next generation behind.”

Sure, it might not be what IT managers came to hear (how to make their data centers run Red Hat Linux better and faster, perhaps), but it was the most inspirational and uplifting keynote I’ve seen kick off an IT conference in the past three years.

I’d say it’s my moment of Xen (sic) for the day, but I hear that term’s been banned by XenSource. ;-)

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  • Longly
    although that’s what the characters here call it. A hostile takeover can really only happen to a publicly traded company, which can’t directly control whom its shares are sold to. In this case, Carlton Co. agreed to the sale of Damage Control to Hoag.
    40 pointsBadges:
    report

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