.NET Developments

Feb 15 2008   9:50AM GMT

Introducing the new .NET Developments bloggers



Posted by: Brian Eastwood
Tags:
General Microsoft news

All good things must come to an end. This is my final week as the site editor of SearchWinDevelopment.com.

It’s been a good ride — I’ve seen Ajax and Silverlight catch fire, I’ve covered two Visual Studio launches and, just to keep myself busy, I’ve been studying Microsoft’s attempt to buy Yahoo — but it’s time for something new, so I’m moving down the row of cubicles to TechTarget’s Vertical Software Media Group.

Thus, now seems like an excellent time to introduce you to some of the new .NET Developments bloggers. If you recall, about a month ago I asked any and all interested parties to get in touch. Two people have started writing thus far — more on them below — and two more will get started soon.

Chris Madsen is a consultant who programs in Visual Basic and Visual Studio 2005. Her posts include They could have told me, in which she notes that, in the world of .NET developers, it’s 2005 and not 2008, and The elusive project properties, in which she describes a Deployment Project Properties treasure hunt.

Christopher Yager is a chief software architect who does most of his work in .NET 2.0. His first post, TFS to the rescue — almost, articulates his efforts to “[connect] our hand-rolled testing metrics program with our Team Foundation Server.” Look for an upcoming post on Windows Communication Foundation certificates.

Feel free to visit their entries and leave a comment or two. We’d love to hear what you think about our new additions to the blog.

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