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  • System Restore

    System Restore is a Windows utility that allows a user to restore their computer data to a specific former state (known as a restore point), undoing changes made since that time.

    ITKE342,215 pointsBadges:
  • Is there a way to use restore points from the Recovery Console?

    System Restore Points are a great thing to have, but what can you do if you can't even boot the system? Let's say it locks up half-way through boot, even in safe mode. Is there a way to use restore points from the Recovery Console?

    jerry111,065 pointsBadges:
  • What happens when a restore point is created using System Restore?

    I agree with you that Windows XP Restore is a great lifesaver, but what exactly happens when a restore point is created? How much disk space is used and where is the disk space allocated?

    jerry111,065 pointsBadges:
  • Quickly and reliably restore system state data

    Use Win2k backup to backup your system state data to a different partition and restores will be faster.

    ITKE342,215 pointsBadges:
  • System Restore from command prompt

    System Restore in Windows XP is an extremely useful tool. Sometimes you may need to run it when your computer won't boot to Windows normally or in Safe Mode. You can still run System Restore in this case by doing the following:

    ITKE342,215 pointsBadges:
  • Running System Restore from the Recovery Console (well, sort of)

    Recovery Console has no built-in way to run System Restore. If the Registry is corrupted, it is possible to do a manual restore, to revert the system to a previous Registry version. But the method is far from perfect.

    SearchSQLServer2,550 pointsBadges:
  • When to reinstall System Restore in Windows XP

    If the mechanisms for performing System Restore become damaged or unregistered, don't panic. It is possible to reinstall System Restore. This tip explains how and when you should.

    SearchSQLServer2,550 pointsBadges:
  • Check large backup sets before a full restore

    It's important to know whether or not you're working with a damaged backup set before trying to perform a restore. Contributor Serdar Yegulalp explains how to determine if a backup set is readable.

    SearchWindowsServer1,975 pointsBadges:
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