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» VIEW ALL POSTS Oct 22 2013   4:37PM GMT

AWS responds to demand for flexible reserved instances



Posted by: Beth Pariseau
Tags:
Amazon AWS

Amazon Web Services will allow users to change the size of reserved instances – a capability that is high on cloud customers’ wish lists.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) customers were left wanting more when Amazon first relaxed restrictions around reserved instance (RI) networking and geographic location last month. RIs can now be moved among availability zones and between EC2 Classic and virtual private cloud networks.

Several customers had the idea of ‘trading in’ instances within a certain total pool of resources in order to resize them – and that appears to be exactly what Amazon has done.

The AWS blog has the breakdown of compute units which can be traded between instance sizes. For example, one small instance translates into 64 8xlarge instances, so 64 small instances can be combined into one 8xlarge, or one 8xlarge can be broken up into 64 small instances.

“It’s a near perfect answer to the wish we expressed back in September,” said Nicolas Fonrose, founder of Teevity, a cloud computing monitoring software startup based in France. “I’m sure this is going to really increase RI usage since it removes something that was really painful for any AWS user.”

However, there’s still room for even more added flexibility with RIs, Fonrose pointed out. Today these modifications can only be performed within instance families (m1, m2, m3 and c1).

“There’s one thing that users are still locked to: instance families,” he said.

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