Head in the Clouds: SaaS, PaaS, and Cloud Strategy

Oct 19 2012   10:39AM GMT

Quest says APM solution resolves ‘application bloat’

Adam Riglian Profile: Adam Riglian

Waistlines traditionally expand as the weather gets colder. Quest Software, recently acquired by Dell, has discovered bloating can be a problem for companies using cloud applications as well, according to results from a new survey the company sponsored.

Senior IT officials from 150 companies with more than 500 applications and $500 million in revenue were surveyed by Harris Interactive for the report, which concludes companies are potentially losing millions due to poor application management.

More than half of respondents said applications that were slow, unresponsive or crashed cost their businesses big money each year. Twenty nine percent of respondents reported losing money in the millions, and 7% said they lost tens of millions or more each year.

Quest is a maker of application performance management (APM) software, a field that has expanded in step with the growing world of cloud and mobile applications. Legacy vendors like Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Oracle and Microsoft compete with mid-sized companies and upstarts, from AppDynamics and New Relic to AppNeta, for control of this growing market.

The pitch from these companies is similar: If no one is watching your applications, you’re losing money. Automating the monitoring of applications and building alerts when something isn’t working properly can reduce downtime and save money. Additionally, some APM tools have predictive analytics capabilities that alert users to problems before they happen.

In the survey’s view, that would be a big help for IT departments unable to keep a watchful eye on all its applications. Less than half of applications are accessed more than five times a day by 76% of IT managers, according to the survey.

Companies have been making use of APM tools to fix a wide variety of problems. Vodafone Ireland used HP’s APM tools to increase performance and centralize monitoring and Aptela used AppNeta’s APM appliance to fix problems with its users networks.

Follow Adam Riglian on Twitter @AdamRiglian

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