Channel Marker

Oct 31 2009   1:57PM GMT

Oracle addresses Glassfish, other Sun software futures

badarrow Barbara Darrow Profile: badarrow

Oracle execs up to and including Larry Ellison have been vocal about their plan to continue, even boost, support for Java and Solaris. This week the company started talking up plans for some of Sun’s more niche software products, albeit in a very general way.

Check out the updated FAQ on Oracle.com, which says that Glassfish will also be safe and sound.

“Oracle plans to continue evolving GlassFish Enterprise Server, delivering it as the open source reference implementation (RI) of the Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) specifications, and actively supporting the large GlassFish community. Additionally, Oracle plans to invest in aligning common infrastructure components and innovations from Oracle WebLogic Server and GlassFish Enterprise Server to benefit both Oracle WebLogic Server and GlassFish Enterprise Server customers.”

Of course, given the hesitance of the European regulators, Oracle has to make nice. To that point, the FAQ’s reiterate Ellison’s Oracle OpenWorld promise to treasure and nurture MySQL.

“Oracle plans to spend more money developing MySQL than Sun does now. Oracle expects to continue to develop and provide the open source MySQL database after the transaction closes. Oracle plans to add MySQL to Oracle’s existing suite of database products, which already includes Berkeley DB, an open source database. Oracle also currently offers InnoDB, an open source transactional storage engine and the most important and popular transaction engine under MySQL. Oracle already distributes MySQL as part of our Enterprise Linux offering.”

Netbeans? Safe.

 
“NetBeans is expected to provide an additional open source option and complement to the two free tools Oracle already offers for enterprise Java development: Oracle JDeveloper and Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse. While Oracle JDeveloper remains Oracle’s strategic development tool for the broad portfolio of Oracle Fusion Middleware products and for Oracle’s next generation of enterprise applications, developers will be able to use whichever free tool they are most comfortable with for pure Java and Java EE development: JDeveloper, Enterprise Pack for Eclipse, or NetBeans.”

 
More on this on Savio Rodrieques’ blog.

 

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