The Business-Technology Weave

May 7 2010   9:20AM GMT

Managing People in the Weave, Part II: WorkOns; WorkWiths and WorkFors…

David Scott David Scott Profile: David Scott

 

Let’s provide the definitions for the classes of folks we talked about in the prior post (please refer to that if you haven’t yet read):  There are three classes of people the successful IT leader must manage – in the organization at-large:

 

     Those you work on:  The first group is those people in the IT department reporting to you, an IT leader.  This is the group of people that you formally manage, appraise, mentor, coach, reward, and discipline.  This group also includes vendors and contractors, for while they don’t report directly to you as their employer, they are subordinate to you.  They do report to you within the scope of a project or service agreement.  You indeed rate their work as feedback to their employer, and you even hire and fire these people for and from whatever endeavor they are supporting.  From here on, let’s indicate everyone in this group as WorkOns.

 

     Those you work with:  The second group is IT’s fellow managers and business staff – co-workers with whom IT has no direct formal control from a management standpoint.  In keeping with our syntax, these folks are WorkWiths.  

 

     Those you work for:  The third group is those people who occupy hierarchy in the organization above IT; those who directly and indirectly manage IT.  These are IT’s direct supervision, the governance team, the senior executive class/directors/managers, boards, and any other authorities with influence.  Hereafter referred to as WorkFors.

   

Given these recognitions, how do we leverage them?…

 

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