IT Bookworm Blog


June 18, 2009  5:00 AM

Implementing multicast on Cisco Catalyst switches

BrentSheets Brent Sheets Profile: BrentSheets

Overview: “Cisco LAN Switching Fundamentals presents an in-depth look at modern campus network requirements. It provides an easy-to-understand introduction to LAN switching best practices using Cisco Catalyst switches. This book provides you with a wealth of details on the architecture, operation, and configuration of the Cisco Catalyst family of switches. You learn about a wide range of topics, including quality of service (QoS), multicast, Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), Multiple Spanning Tree (MST), private virtual LANs (VLANs), and configuration using the native and hybrid software interfaces.”

This free chapter has been selected from Cisco LAN Switching Fundamentals by Cisco Press. Enjoy the chapter and be sure to check out the related Router and Switch management resources listed below. Voice your feedback on this chapter or let us know of other books you’d like to see featured on the IT Bookworm Blog by leaving a comment. Thanks.

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Cisco LAN Switching Fundamentals Written by
Title
Published by
Published on
ISBN-10
ISBN-13
David Barnes and Basir Sakandar
Cisco LAN Switching Fundamentals
Cisco Press
November 16, 2008
1587058499
978-1587058493

Download the chapter DOWNLOAD THE CHAPTER
Chapter 9: Implementing Multicast on Catalyst Switches

RELATED PEER ADVICE
  → Visit our Networking community
  → Need answers? Ask your own Switch or Networking question
  → Browse the Editor Q&A on the SearchNetworking.com Public Profile

RELATED RESOURCES
  → Visit the The Network Hub blog
  → Visit the David’s Cisco Networking blog
  → Visit the Window on WANs blog
  → Visit the SearchNetworking.com website
  → Visit the SearchEnterpriseWAN.com website
  → Browse Network Management resources
  → Browse Network Administration resources
  → Browse Network Infrastructure resources
  → Browse Enterprise Networking News
  → Browse Networking White Papers

RELATED CONTENT
  → IT Definitions: Multicast (visit the Routing and Switching Glossary and Network Hardware Glossary for more)
  → Article: Cisco expands Nexus data center switch line with eye on virtualization
  → Article: Cisco EEM scripting gets a reboot — and helps cut response times
  → Article: Switch WAN optimization appliances to software for simpler mobile WAN
  → Blog: Cisco plans to enter 50 new markets: acquisitions inevitable
  → Blog: Cisco and HP: Data center frenemies now poised for all-out war
  → Screencast: Upgrading the Cisco IOS
  → Guide: Switching and routing: The next generation
  → E-Book: The essential guide for upgrading your network
  → Video: The Switching Kitchen: Learn the basic features of Cisco switches
  → Quiz: Networking Hardware

June 8, 2009  5:00 AM

Cloud Computing set to change roles in IT

BrentSheets Brent Sheets Profile: BrentSheets

In addition to providing free sample chapters from the latest enterprise IT and development books – this blog invites authors of IT books to submit guest posts. I’m pleased to present our first guest post from Peter Fingar, author of Dot Cloud: The 21st Century Business Platform. Enjoy this article on Cloud Computing – and be sure to download the free chapter from Peter’s book. You may leave comments for the author at the end of the article. Thanks!

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By Peter Fingar, author of Dot Cloud: The 21st Century Business Platform
Meghan-Kiffer Press, 2009 ( Download a free sample chapter )

Bear with me for a minute, for a little history is in order to understand where we stand in the evolution of technology today. Once upon a time, computer programmers wired boards on tabulating machines to process decks of punch cards produced by a transistorized computer that, in turn, had to be instructed in machine-like languages. The good programmers were not necessarily abstract thinkers, but they were very mechanically inclined.

From punched cards, it was on to magnetic tapes and disk drives and newfangled procedural programming languages like COBOL and FORTRAN. Still the programmers were machine-oriented thinkers and geeks who walked around the electronic data processing (EDP) center carrying their status symbols: mag tapes.

Then, when telecommunications became more sophisticated and companies began acquiring computerized PBXs, the EDP department became the information technology (IT) department, and eventually EDP managers became IT directors. Then, oops, along came object-oriented programming (OOP) systems and a step-change in abstraction. Programming was no longer procedural. It became a request-respond world, where one, let’s say a C++ or Java object, requested and got a response from another without knowing how the other object did its thing internally.

Objects were much like actors on a stage, each with its own role and capabilities, and it was the objects’ interactions that made up a given computer program. At about the same time, the emergence of relational databases brought about ERP systems, where during a painful period of business reengineering, departmental silos were torn down by integrating the data and processes once held exclusively inside each silo. This was a great step forward in streamlining businesses, and the role of the chief information officer (CIO) was established. At this point, data centers were staffed by systems analysts, database administrators, database programmers, data administrators and technical systems administrators. Quite an expensive command-and-control army had grown up to support and control central IT, where a company’s systems-of-record were housed.

Meanwhile, enter stage left, the PC and VisiCalc.

Oh my. Now business departments could do their own numerical computing using spreadsheets independent of central IT involvement. It’s amazing that to this day a large part of what companies keep track of is contained in Excel spreadsheets scattered across a given firm. Then Microsoft unleashed another trend with Visual Basic, opening up computer programming to many outside the walls of central IT.

Rather than guard their centralized fortresses, smart CIOs and their IT staffs reached out to all this distributed processing to develop eventerprise architectures that could bring some coherence to it all. But then the Internet and then the Web and then on to the great step-change, Web 2.0. Internet 1.0 was basically a delivery mechanism for read-only brochureware until Amazon showed the world that see-buy-get transactions could be processed on the Net. Initially it was the retail industries that got Amazon’d and had to change their operations to do business transactions on the Internet. Now most industries conduct business on the Internet.

Then, enter stage right, the read-write Internet, Web 2.0, where just about anybody can go beyond consuming information to producing it as well. Programmer? Who needs one? You just access preprogrammed services to create a website, join Facebook, tweet on Twitter, update a Wiki, create a blog or mash up your custom Google apps. Just about anyone can do it, just as they could with a spreadsheet — no central IT department needed.

Web 2.0 represents the consumerization of IT, and you might think that’s the end of this three-minute history of technology. No, all that was yesterday. Now the real action has just begun with the read-write-execute Internet. It’s called the cloud. If you take all of the amazing advances in computing over the past 50 years, as described above, the cloud represents the knee in an exponential growth curve, making cloud computing the new baseline for business and human collaboration models we have yet to conceive of and the new Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos we have yet to hear of. Goodbye General Motors, hello BYD Auto, the auto maker that Warren Buffett just invested $232 million in.

In the past, information technology was about productivity; now it’s about collaboration, a shared information base and collective intelligence — the wisdom of crowds, social networks and cloudsourcing of unimaginable computing power, all in the hands of everyday people.

Remember that mechanically inclined board wirer described just three paragraphs ago? Or that EDP manager, or that IT director or that CIO? Move over, for it’s now time for the chief cloud officer (CCO). The role of the CCO is to provide leadership in a brave new world where the level of abstraction of not just programming but also technology infrastructures are abstracted as services — Everything as a Service (EaaS).

Although tech-savvy, the CCO is all business, probably coming out of the ranks of operations or an extremely business-savvy CIO. It will indeed be informed leadership, not command-and-control management of computing and information resources that will shape the future of companies and countries in the current era of global economic crisis and unexpected change. Agility is no longer an option, a nice to have. It’s the entry price. Lead, follow or get out of the way. There is much to learn and cultural barriers to overcome, but the company of the future will not be the company of today. The future is here now, as we shift from information technology (IT) to business technology (BT), from systems-of-record to systems of boundless collaboration backed by endless computational resources available to all.

Peter Fingar PETER FINGAR is an internationally recognized expert on business process management and business strategy. He is a former CIO and practitioner with over thirty years of hands-on experience at the intersection of business and technology. Peter has taught graduate computing studies and has held management, technical and advisory positions with GTE Data Services, American Software and Computer Services, Saudi Aramco, EC Cubed, the Technical Resource Connection division of Perot Systems and IBM Global Services. He is an author of nine best-selling books and has delivered keynote talks and papers to professional conferences across the globe. Contact him at www.peterfingar.com.

RELATED RESOURCES
→ The Troposphere Blog
Meteorology for the cloud computing world
→ SearchCloudComputing.com
The Web’s most comprehensive resource for cloud computing news, analysis and case studies


June 4, 2009  5:00 AM

Manage fine-grained password and account lockout policies

BrentSheets Brent Sheets Profile: BrentSheets

Overview: “Real Solutions for Active Directory 2008 Administrators. Need fast, reliable, easy-to-implement solutions for Microsoft Active Directory 2008? This book delivers exactly what you’re looking for. You’ll find nearly 250 tested, step-by-step procedures for planning, installing, customizing, and managing Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) in any production environment. Completely up-to-date, it fully reflects the brand new version of Active Directory introduced in Windows Server 2008, which contains the most significant changes since AD was first introduced.”

This free chapter has been selected from Active Directory Domain Services 2008 How-To by Sams Publishing. Enjoy the chapter and be sure to check out the related Active Directory resources listed below. Voice your feedback on this chapter or let us know of other books you’d like to see featured on the IT Bookworm Blog by leaving a comment. Thanks.

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Active Directory Domain Services 2008 Written by
Title
Published by
Published on
ISBN-10
ISBN-13
John Policelli
Active Directory Domain Services 2008 How-To
Sams Publishing
May 22, 2009
0672330458
978-0672330452

Download the chapter DOWNLOAD THE CHAPTER
Chapter 11: Manage fine-grained password and account lockout policies

RELATED PEER ADVICE
  → Visit our Active Directory community
  → Need answers? Ask your own Active Directory question
  → Browse the Editor Q&A on the SearchWindowsServer.com Public Profile

RELATED RESOURCES
  → Visit the The Windows Server Notebook blog
  → Visit the SearchWindowsServer.com website
  → Browse Active Directory Design and Administration resources
  → Browse Active Directory Upgrades and Migration resources
  → Browse Active Directory and DNS resources
  → Browse Active Directory Replication resources
  → Browse Active Directory Security resources
  → Browse Group Policy resources
  → Browse Active Directory Backup and Recovery resources
  → Browse Active Directory Scripting resources
  → Browse Active Directory Tools and Troubleshooting resources

RELATED CONTENT
  → IT Definitions: Active Directory (visit the Active Directory FAQ for more)
  → Video: New AD features in Windows 2008
  → Video: Breaking down the RODC with Windows 2008
  → Checklist: Preparing for Windows Server 2008 migration
  → Tips: Top 5 Active Directory tips of 2008
  → Guide: Active Directory Changes Guide
  → Guide: IT managers eye new Windows Server 2008 features
  → Guide: Windows Server 2008 Learning Guide
  → Guide: Microsoft Group Policy Tutorial
  → Scripting School: Introducing Active Directory to Windows PowerShell


May 28, 2009  5:00 AM

The evolution of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0

BrentSheets Brent Sheets Profile: BrentSheets

Overview: “Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Unleashed presents start-to-finish guidance for planning, customizing, deploying, integrating, and managing Dynamics CRM in your unique business and technical environment. Authored by two leading Microsoft Dynamics implementers, this book systematically explains how the system works, why it works that way, and how you can leverage it to its fullest advantage.

The authors present clear examples, proven best practices, and pitfalls to avoid in using every significant Dynamics CRM capability. The far-reaching coverage ranges from Dynamics CRM’s sales, marketing, and customer service features to its automated workflows; from Outlook and Office integration to reporting and security. The authors offer independent insight into Dynamics CRM’s most powerful new features, from its improved interface to its new mail merge and data migration tools.”

This free chapter has been selected from Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Unleashed by Sams Publishing. Enjoy the chapter and be sure to check out the related Microsoft Dynamics CRM resources listed below. Voice your feedback on this chapter or let us know of other books you’d like to see featured on the IT Bookworm Blog by leaving a comment. Thanks.

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Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Unleashed Written by
Title
Published by
Published on
ISBN-10
ISBN-13
Marc J. Wolenik and Damian Sinay
Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 Unleashed
Sams Publishing
March 15, 2008
0672329700
978-0672329708

Download the chapter DOWNLOAD THE CHAPTER
Chapter 3: The evolution of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0

RELATED PEER ADVICE
  → Visit our CRM community
  → Need answers? Ask your own CRM question
  → Browse Q&A from the Editors SearchCRM.com Public Profile

RELATED RESOURCES
  → Visit the Voices of CRM blog
  → Visit the SearchCRM.com website
  → Learning Path: Customer Relationship Management
  → Tutorials: CRM Tutorials
  → Topics: CRM technology, software and vendor information

RELATED CONTENT
  → IT Definitions: CRM (visit the CRM Glossary for more)
  → Article: Forrester offers ways to mine more value from CRM implementations
  → Sceencast: Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0 demo
  → Podcast: What you need to know about MS Dynamics 4.0
  → Podcast: Microsoft users give CRM tips
  → Advice: The top CRM advice from experts
  → Special Report: Microsoft Dynamics CRM 4.0
  → Quiz: Test your Microsoft Dynamics CRM knowledge (view more CRM quizzes)


May 21, 2009  5:00 AM

What defines a next-generation and virtual data center?

BrentSheets Brent Sheets Profile: BrentSheets

Overview: “A green and virtual data center relies on the efficient usage of underlying physical resources to achieve energy savings. Green servers, storage, and networks deliver the performance, availability, and responsiveness for all types of application needs and requirements.

This book provides strategies and blueprints for enabling and deploying environmentally friendly next-generation data centers. Addressing multiple technology domains and disciplines, it looks at design and implementation tradeoffs using various best practices and technologies to sustain application and business growth while maximizing resources, such as power, cooling, floor space, storage, server performance, and network capacity. The book shows how to make server and storage virtualization energy efficient and still be able to support a diversity of high-performance applications. It also explores performance and capacity planning in a virtual environment that supports resource-demanding applications, such as OLTP and streaming media.”

This free chapter has been selected from The Green and Virtual Data Center by CRC Press. Enjoy the chapter and be sure to check out the related Green Data Center resources listed below. Voice your feedback on this chapter or let us know of other books you’d like to see featured on the IT Bookworm Blog by leaving a comment. Thanks.

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The Green and Virtual Data Center by Greg Schulz Written by
Title
Published by
Published on
ISBN-10
ISBN-13
15% Discount
Greg Schulz
The Green and Virtual Data Center
CRC Press
January 26, 2009
1420086669
978-1420086669
Use code 682CC

Download the chapter DOWNLOAD THE CHAPTER
Chapter 4: What defines a next-generation and virtual data center?

RELATED PEER ADVICE
  → Visit our Data Center community
  → Need answers? Ask your own Green Data Center question

RELATED RESOURCES
  → Browse Green Data Center resources
  → Browse Data center power consumption and savings resources
  → Browse E-waste and computer recycling resources
  → Visit the Data center facilities pro blog
  → Visit the SearchDataCenter.com website
  → Visit the SearchServerVirtualization.com website

RELATED CONTENT
  → IT Definitions: Green Data Center (visit the Data Center Glossary and Green Technology Terms Glossary for more)
  → E-Book: The Green Data Center: Energy-Efficient Computing in the 21st Century
  → Author Q&A: Closing the green gap (Chapter 1 in PDF available)
  → Article: Data center industry unites to drag LEED into green IT
  → Article: Green Grid tool assesses free cooling potential
  → Blog: Confused by green data centers? Don’t be.
  → Blog: Sorting through data center utility rebates
  → Blog: Top ten industry demands from Data Center Pulse
  → Blog: Green Grid Postmortem: Successes and the work ahead
  → Webcast: Going Green Speakers Panel by SearchDataCenter
  → Quiz: Greening the cube farm


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