Enterprise IT Watch Blog


September 13, 2011  8:20 AM

Law and Order: Cisco

Melanie Yarbrough Profile: MelanieYarbrough

Think you can do what Cisco does? Not so fast, Chun-Yu Zhao.

Reports of the sentencing of a Virginia woman, Chun-Yu Zhao, convicted of leading a counterfeiting group that specialized in Cisco equipment are circulating today. Add money laundering and fraudulent citizenship practices, and what kind of punishment can you expect? Sixty months in prison, $2.7M, a $17,500 fine, and three years of supervised release after her term.

But Zhao won’t be returning to her various homes, condos, Porsches, Mercedes, bank accounts, or even her U.S. citizenship after her sentence is up, the majority of which will be seized by the federal government.

Cisco and the federal government are no strangers to counterfeit IT products, which spurred the heightened effort to target companies peddling these knock-off goods, usually in the form of Cisco resellers. In 2005, the Department of Justice, FBI, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customers and Border Protection (CBP) reported over 700 separate instances of seizing counterfeit network equipment during Operation Network Raider. There have been over $143M in seizures, $3.6M in restitution ordered, five convictions, and over a decade in sentences being served for these crimes. As usual, what is actually lost — security where it’s needed most — can only be returned over time with continued efforts such as these.

Melanie Yarbrough is the assistant community editor at ITKnowledgeExchange.com. Follow her on Twitter or send her an email at Melanie@ITKnowledgeExchange.com.

September 7, 2011  2:52 PM

HP’s head in the clouds, this time on purpose

Melanie Yarbrough Profile: MelanieYarbrough

HP took a break from confusing everyone regarding its PC business and announced its HP Cloud Services program in private beta today. About a month after HP announced it had joined OpenStack, the company is sharing the fruits of its labor – compute and storage IaaS pay-as-you-go offerings – on the HP blog:

  • HP Cloud Compute allows you to deploy compute instances on-demand. It lets you customize your instances to handle your unique workloads and add new instances to quickly scale.
  • HP Cloud Object Storage provides you with scalable online storage capacity on-demand. Object storage is ideal for archiving and backing up data, serving static content for web applications, and storing large public or private data sets, such as online files and media.

The announcement comes on the heels of Dell’s entrance into the public cloud world last week. But while Dell’s platform is built on VMware’s suite, HP plans to offer its cloud without the bonds of legacy infrastructure. HP’s VP of cloud solutions, Patrick Harr, told Derrick Harris of GigaOm in June that HP intended to compete with big name cloud providers such as Amazon Web Services and Rackspace, choosing also to focus on developers. I wonder if HP’s recent bucking of webOS – and the subsequent effects on developers – will have any bearing on the cooperation and excitement from the development community. Perhaps this will knock HP up on the scale of cloud computing vendors, but the likeliness of this ambition may be too soon to tell. HP is asking for feedback on the private beta program, crediting feedback from its first development stage for the state of the private beta offerings.

If you plan to register, I suggest doing it sooner than later to join the fun. If you do, let us know what you think!

Melanie Yarbrough is the assistant community editor at ITKnowledgeExchange.com. Follow her on Twitter or send her an email at Melanie@ITKnowledgeExchange.com.


September 6, 2011  9:25 AM

HP: We’re committed to the PC … just in an open relationship

Michael Morisy Michael Morisy Profile: Michael Morisy

Maybe Léo Apotheker has just been watching too much CW: HP insists it isn’t dumping its market-leading PC making division, it’s just spinning it off. Making it more agile. Well, that’s the preferred course. What actually happens … Well, let’s just see how things go? No labels or anything, ok?

And that’s the muddled message HP is sending when it literally owns every pixel, such as in the below advertisement (full text below):

Continued »


September 2, 2011  11:05 AM

Introducing VMware’s Octopus, with tentacles poised at Dropbox and Sharepoint

Michael Morisy Michael Morisy Profile: Michael Morisy

Throughout VMworld I was asked again and again, “What’s the most exciting thing you’ve seen?”. And while there were a lot of great tools on display (check out SearchServerVirtualization’s Best of VMworld), the one that sold me after just a few minutes was VMware’s Octopus. I convinced J.J. Zhuang to give me an extended tour of the package, the video of which I’ll post soon, but it looks great – much better, in fact, than the Project Octopus VMware CTO Steve Herrod demonstrated that same morning during his keynote. Continued »


September 2, 2011  6:25 AM

Windows 8: Have your desktop and eat it, too

Michael Morisy Melanie Yarbrough Profile: MelanieYarbrough

“Essentially, you can think of the Windows desktop as just another app,” Steven Sinofsky explains in the Windows 8 blog’s most recent post.

Apple’s one-liner returns to me, like it does most days when someone repeats it, jokingly, as though they were the first to say it: There’s an app for that. This is the world we live in: Applications have replaced hard wires and permanence. Even our phones may have split personalities some day very soon. Hardware is being created as a reflective surface, merely presenting information rather than storing it anymore.

Discussion of Windows 8, and the team’s vision for the new OS, brings this to a new level. The OS’s Metro version is a world of floating apps. Users have the option to remain in the “Metro world” without ever seeing the desktop, the code never having loaded onto your machine. “This is Windows reimagined,” Sinofsky says.

Or is it really just Windows undecided? Continued »


September 1, 2011  9:13 AM

Sponsored: Trend Micro demos their latest cloud tech at VMworld

Michael Morisy Guest Author Profile: Guest Author

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/Re6scgGr1uk" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

Trend Micro gives a demonstration at VMWorld 2011 on how they’re helping business tap into the advantages of the cloud while maintaining secure policies.


August 30, 2011  5:22 PM

Like Superman/Clark Kent for your phone: VMware’s Mobile Virtualization Platform (MVP)

Michael Morisy Michael Morisy Profile: Michael Morisy

I had a chance to sit down with Srinivas Krishnamurti, VMware’s senior director of mobile products, and check out the Mobile Virtualization Platform (MVP). MVP is an interesting concept that blends both personal and professional phone usage by actually installing a separate virtual instance of Android on select handsets (VMware currently has partnership with LG, Samsung and Verizon to bring the devices to market).

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/6OTn_qapKaw" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

The demo he gave looked great: Apps were responsive, alerts from one OS popped up on the other’s notifications, and switching back and forth was a relative breeze. The concept of a dual-mode work life/personal life phone isn’t new, but VMware might have the first credible take at making it a reality: The “work” side of the phone is completely encrypted and can be remotely wiped by IT.

The two biggest questions that remain in my mind are, like with many of VMware’s ambitious new launches:

  • How well will this work compared to not running a virtualized OS? It’s an extra layer of complexity and software on already limited devices, and there’s been speculation that the phone processors could drag.
  • How well can VMware partner to bring these phones out into the market?

The second question is important: VMware and LG first partnered about a year ago, no commercial products that support the technology are shipping yet, and Krishnamurti said it was impossible to pinpoint when MVP devices would hit the market due to ongoing negotiations with carriers. And while a VMware employee proudly touted that LG and Samsung were the two largest phone makers, that’s not necessarily an indicator of future success.

Michael Morisy is the editorial director for ITKnowledgeExchange. He can be followed on Twitter or you can reach him at Michael@ITKnowledgeExchange.com.


August 30, 2011  3:44 PM

Microsoft wedges its way into VMworld 2011 with anti-VMware video

Michael Morisy Melanie Yarbrough Profile: MelanieYarbrough

Not to be left out, Microsoft has asserted its opinion on host of this week’s big conference in Las Vegas, VMworld 2011, by way of a Youtube video touting its private cloud services. The video pokes fun at VMware’s longstanding decision to stay out of multi-hypervisor management (since, according to VMware, no one is demanding Hyper-V management anyway) and appeals to the ultimate nightmare in technology: getting left behind. While the point of the ad seems to be Microsoft saying “Hey! Look at me!” more than sending an actual message, the idea that virtualization is a thing of the past may not be too convincing for VMWorld’s over 20,000 attendees.

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/hewedqvSWaI" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

This isn’t the first case of Microsoft playing dirty, something VMware has grown accustomed to in the past few years. What are your thoughts on the feud and the ad? Does Microsoft have a case or are they blowing smoke?

Let me know in the comments section or send an email directly to Melanie@ITKnowledgeExchange.com.

Melanie Yarbrough is the assistant community editor at ITKnowledgeExchange.com. Follow her on Twitter or send her an email at Melanie@ITKnowledgeExchange.com.


August 30, 2011  12:27 PM

Far from VMWorld, virtualization contender Red Hat starts lobbing stones

Michael Morisy Michael Morisy Profile: Michael Morisy

How do you know you’re successful? You start finding more enemies. A recent article by Steven Vaughn-Nichols should bring a smile to fans of VMWare: Red Hat, the enterprise Linux giant, sees itself facing off not against enterprise mainstays like Oracle in the future but virtualization and cloud companies. Specifically, VMware:
Continued »


August 29, 2011  11:30 AM

VMworld, come hell or high water

Michael Morisy Michael Morisy Profile: Michael Morisy

This year’s attendees might be facing a little of both as they make their way to VMware’s annual conference: Even as Hurricane-cum-Tropical Storm Irene was wreaking H20 havoc across the Northeast and canceling Sunday, Monday and even Tuesday flights, conference host Las Vegas was flirting with temperatures of 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Fortunately, it looks like the conference won’t be a wash: Virtualization Room/SearchServerVirtualization contributor Eric Siebert reported via Twitter that attendance was up to 10,000 paid attendees (20,000 total) from 6,000 last year. Look back to 2009, when attendance was dropping, and it might help one feel better about the state of virtualization adoption, the economy or simply the enduring appeal of Sin City. Either way, I think it’s a win.

Among the 20,000 in attendance will be myself, Mr. Denny of SQL Server fame and a large contingent of top-notch reporters and editors from SearchVirtualization, already on the ground in force. Follow their coverage at SearchVMworld2011.com.

Michael Morisy is the editorial director for ITKnowledgeExchange. He can be followed on Twitter or you can reach him at Michael@ITKnowledgeExchange.com. Photo source is Flickr user rdmathers and licensed under Creative Commons.


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