Enterprise IT Watch Blog

Aug 30 2011   12:27PM GMT

Far from VMWorld, virtualization contender Red Hat starts lobbing stones

Michael Morisy Michael Morisy Profile: Michael Morisy

How do you know you’re successful? You start finding more enemies. A recent article by Steven Vaughn-Nichols should bring a smile to fans of VMWare: Red Hat, the enterprise Linux giant, sees itself facing off not against enterprise mainstays like Oracle in the future but virtualization and cloud companies. Specifically, VMware:

With Red Hat KVM and RHEL, Whitehurst also observed that companies won’t have to worry about extracting their value from the cloud. If, for example, you don’t like your cloud provider, or you just want to move from say a private cloud to a public one, the Red Hat KVM-based PaaS will let you shift cloud providers easily.

That is not the case, according to Whitehurst, with companies that use VMware-based solutions. In the long run, by 2016, corporate users will be moving to Red Hat and other OVA partners from VMware solutions, Whitehurst believes.

Whitehurst also sees VMware as being more of a pure Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), ala Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (AWS), play. IaaS’ are fine, as far as they go, but Whitehurst believes that Red Hat’s KVM-based solution simply offers more power and ease of use to corporate customers.

The friendly competition shouldn’t be surprising: Red Hat’s been a corporate maverick its entire existence, and all the trend lines point to the deeper levels of control, flexibility and modularity that virtualization provides, particularly as businesses look to balance portability and security against the numerous benefits cloud giants like Amazon and SalesForce.com can offer.

The big question is whether Red Hat’s approach, leveraging open-source Kernel-based Virtual Machine, can trump the fast-expanding portfolio of products VMware seems to be unveiling daily. In fact, the company’s major marketing for this particular event – Go public, go private, go hybrid – tout that same flexibility and portability.

Have some thoughts on which virtualization technology is – or should – win out? Let me know at Michael@ITKnowledgeExchange.com.

Image is original to this blog and is licensed under a Creative Commons share alike license. It is based on VMware’s copyrighted logo.

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  • Michael Morisy
    [...] How do you know you’re successful? You start finding more enemies. A recent article by Steven Vaughn-Nichols should bring a smile to fans of VMWare: Red Hat, the enterprise Linux giant, sees itself facing off not against enterprise mainstays like Oracle in the future but virtualization and cloud companies. Specifically, VMWare…CONTINUED [...]
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